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FS – Edwards Bass Trombone Bell

For sale – one Edwards 1147CF bell – among Edwards’ most popular.  It is red brass, soldered rim, tempered, double buffed and CF treated with a 9 1/2″ bell. No dents, perhaps some mute marks.  There are spots of lacquer discoloration and some scratches that are shown in the photos.

A new one is $900 – I’m asking $450 plus shipping for this one.

Edwards 1147CF Bell

Edwards 1147CF Bell

Edwards Bell 1147CF

Edwards Bell 1147CF

Edwards Bell Scratches

Edwards Bell Scratches

Edwards Bell Lacquer

Edwards Bell Lacquer

Contact me at biz-at-johnesimmons

dot-com

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Coastal Brass Choir Concert, February 18

Coastal Brass Choir

The Coastal Brass Choir will perform Thursday, February 18 at Darien, Georgia’s St. Andrews Episcopal Church.  The program will be a mix from Garibaldi to jazz.

Admission is free. Hope to see you there.

 

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Sold – Conn 4h Trombone

For sale, Conn 4h from 1947 according to serial number, silver plate, gold wash bell.  As shown in the photos, there are small dents in the bell section (almost unphotographable), dents in the tuning slide (don’t affect operation), and wear on the main slide.  I don’t know how to give the slide a rating number, but with fresh Yahama slide oil, it plays OK.  I don’t feel or hear any dents in the main slide, but if I were going to play it a lot, I’d get the slide trued by a tech. An ultrasonic cleaning would probably be a good idea,too. The case has wear on the covering and stain inside, but it is solid and protects the horn.  Original lyre included.
I’m amazed that Dillons sells these things for $650-900.
I’d like $250 plus shipping. Send an address and I’ll compute the actual shipping cost.  I can do USPS, UPS or FedEx Paypal is fine.

Contact me by email biz-at-johnesimmons-
dot-com.

4h Bell Section

4h Bell Section

4h Bell Dent

4h Bell Dent

4h Tuning Slide Dent

4h Tuning Slide Dent

4h Bell Engraving

4h Bell Engraving

4h Bell Gold Wash

4h Bell Gold Wash

4h Slide

4h Slide

4h Slide Wear 1

4h Slide Wear 1

4h Slide Wear 2

4h Slide Wear 2

4hC ase

4hC ase

4h Lyre

4h Lyre

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The Daily Routine of an Independent Writer

Writing

What does an independent writer do every day?  Amazon shares this video with us.

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Happy Birthday, Tom

Tom Jobim Composing

Antonio Carlos “Tom” Jobim would have been 89-years old today.  He combined the influences of Heitor Villa-Lobos with interesting chord progressions, haunting melodies and the popular rhythms of Brazil to become one of the great composers of the 20th century.

Here he is rehearsing at home with his band, Banda Nova – Simone Caymii, Maucha Adnet, Ana Lontra Jobim, Paula Morelenbaum, Beth Jobim, Jaques Morelenbaum, Danilo Caymii, Paulo Jobim, Paulo Brago, and Tiao Neto.

And here is the band performing live in Montreal with Danilo singing one of those haunting melodies in Samba Do Aviao

And speaking of Maucha Adnet, she is appearing Valentine’s Day, Sunday February 14th at the Tilles Center in Brookville, New York.

And here’s Mauca having fun with Tom Jobim on home video.

 

 

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Fear-Not Knowing

Better Call Saul

My writer’s group has been discussing Leslie Leyland Fields’ blog post entitled “The 7-Fears of Every Writing Project.”

Point Five is of particular interest to me.

5. Fear Not!—-That you don’t know where your novel, trilogy, even your memoir is headed. No one you know informs you of the outcome of their lives, do they? How many of your friends know where their lives are headed and how they will get there and who they will be once they’re there? You will not know this for your characters or story until they do. Keep writing day by day, keep listening to them, and you’ll find out what you need at the right time. The writing itself will get you there.

I’ve been watching the DVDs of the TV show “Better Call Saul” and getting a lot out of the director commentaries.

For a television such as this, a continuing story throughout the season rather than stand-alone episodes, I would have thought they would have the whole season written before they started shooting.  But Vince Gilligan, Peter Gould, Michelle MacLaren, et al, talk extensively about learning more about the characters as they go along – learning from the actors and from episodes that go before.

One character, Marco, who became instrumental to the development of the main character, Saul, only came about because one episode ended up eight-minutes short.  The production crew decided to fill that eight minutes with a flashback, which included Marco.  Following that decision, Marco became the pivotal character in the season ending episode.

It would appear that Gilligan and crew took Leslie’s fifth point to heart.

Better Call Saul season two begins on A&E February 15, 2016.

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Remembering Sidney Lanier

Sidney Lanier Cottage

Members of the Coastal Photographers Guild are exhibiting photographs honoring the life of Sidney Lanier at The Horton Gallery – Southeast Georgia Health Systems in Brunswick for the month of January.
Lanier was born in Macon, Georgia at the cottage I photographed above.  He died in North Carolina in 1881 at the age of 39.  Between, he began playing flute at an early age, graduated first in his class from Oglethorpe University, served as a private in the Confederate Army,  and was captured by Union forces while commanding a blockade runner. He was imprisoned at Point Lookout, Maryland, where he contracted tuberculosis.
Returning from the war, he married Mary Day and practiced law with his father.  The building which housed his law office still stands on Second Street in Macon.  In an effort to support his wife and three sons, he wrote and published poetry, including “The Marshes of Glynn”, an unfinished set of lyrical poems about the vast salt marshes of Glynn County, Georgia. The longest bridge in Georgia spans some of those marshes and is named for Lanier.
Later in life, Lanier was on the faculty of Johns Hopkins University and specialized in English novelists.  He wrote a book entitled “The Science of English Verse” in which he developed a theory exploring the connections between musical notation and meter in poetry. He played flute in Baltimore’s Peabody Orchestra.
He died of complications caused by his tuberculosis.
My photograph is of The Sidney Lanier Cottage on High Street in Macon.  I’m honored that it will be included in the Horton Gallery exhibit.
For those technically minded, this photograph was shot with a Mamiya RB-67 camera with a 65mm lens.  It was shot on Kodak Tri-X 120 film. I used an orange filter to darken the sky and developed in Pyrocat PC.
The other photographs in the exhibit were shot in Glynn County and evoke the spirit Lanier showed in his poems about the area.

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Is There Really Only One Story?

From “Avatar” to “The Wizard of Oz” to “Jurassic Park” is there really only one form of dramatic storytelling?

John York takes this position at The Atlantic, where he quotes a 9-year old child:

A family are looking forward to going on holiday. Mom has to sacrifice the holiday in order to pay the rent. Kids find map buried in garden to treasure hidden in the woods, and decide to go after it. They get in loads of trouble and are chased before they finally find it and go on even better holiday.

York asks why a child would unconsciously copy a story form that dates back at least to Beowulf. My initial thought was that the child had heard plenty of stories by the age of 9, and knew the form.  York has a more complex answer.

Storytelling has a shape. It dominates the way all stories are told and can be traced back not just to the Renaissance, but to the very beginnings of the recorded word. It’s a structure that we absorb avidly whether in art-house or airport form and it’s a shape that may be—though we must be careful—a universal archetype.

The idea of a universal story structure is not new, and many writers today are familiar with the 12-stages of a hero’s journey from Joseph Campbell’s “The Hero with a Thousand Faces”, allegedly the model for the first Star Wars movie. York points out that there are lots and lots of books on analysis of story structure, but none of the books ask why these constructs work.

His analysis reminds me of form and analysis classes while I was a music major in college.  Music historians diced and chopped the works of the great composers until they were deprived of all musicality and reduced to a number of Roman numerals and strange fractions.  Did Bach and Mozart think this way about their music?  I strongly doubt it.  They wrote what sounded right to them.  And regular people have agreed for years.

By the 1960s, composers reached the conclusion that music was reduced to math.  They took the 12-notes of the Western musical scale, wrote each note on a slip of paper, put the slips in a hat and drew them randomly.  The resulting order was a tone row – in essence the melody. I find that music horrid.  It’s all form and no art.

York finds some writers, particularly screenwriters, who despise what they see as the restrictions of similar form.

(Guillermo) Del Toro echoes the thoughts of many writers and filmmakers; there’s an ingrained belief for many that the study of structure is, implicitly, a betrayal of their genius; it’s where mediocrities seek a substitute muse. Such study can only end in one way. David Hare puts it well: “The audience is bored. It can predict the exhausted UCLA film-school formulae—acts, arcs, and personal journeys—from the moment that they start cranking. It’s angry and insulted by being offered so much Jung-for-Beginners, courtesy of Joseph Campbell. All great work is now outside genre.”

I’m reminded of the lessons I learned in  “Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance”  – artists create best by working within a structure.  In music, a composer choses a key, a meter, an instrument or instruments and so forth.  Then he creates.

York concludes that authors make similar choices, and all stories are forged from the same template – that the laws of physics, logic and form require writers to follow the same path.  The path of the journey into the woods to find the dark but life-giving secret within.

Read the whole thing.

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