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For sale is a Yamaha SY-77 synthesizer.  It was one of the sounds of the 80s and early 90s.  Listen to an episode of Miami Vice and you hear it constantly.  It is unique in having three, rather than two, mod wheels.

This one is in good shape.  It has been in storage for a couple of years following a move, and I recently pulled it out and tested it.  All of the keys play a note, all of the buttons change the sounds.  All sounds work.  All of the tally lights work. The display is very dim, but, as you can see in the photos, it works.  Replacement backlights are available from Telesis and other places on the internet along with specific instructions.

I put a blank floppy disc into the drive and nothing seemed to happen.  I would assume the drive needs some kind of repair.  Some people have succeeded in getting the drive to work by replacing the drive belt.

As you can see in the photos, one rear corner has cracked and been covered by electrical tape.

Asking $350.00 US plus the actual cost of shipping.

Contact me at this address with SY-77 in the subject header.

 

SY-77

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FormulasThis solution is suitable for treatment of exposed films previous to development, to permit increased darkroom illumination and greater safety for film inspection during development.

 

Pinakryptol Green 1 g
Water to make 500 ml

 

Note – Use of a 50/50 water-alcohol mixture for solution will improve the keeping qualities of the desensitizer.

 

For use, dilute 1 part stock solution with 10 parts water. Immerse films for two minutes at 68F (20C) with room in total darkness, and then transfer to developing solution. After one half of the developing time, films may be inspected for 10-second periods at one-minute intervals; illumination being supplied by a yellow-green safelight (such as Ansco A6 with 10-watt lamp) placed 2 to 3 feet distant. Desensitized films should be developed approximately 50% longer in Ansco 17 or Ansco 47 than non-treated films to obtain comparable gradation and shadow detail.

 

If preferred, the same stock solution may be used directly in the developer in the proportion: 1 part desensitizer, 30 parts developer. This procedure should not be followed with developers containing more than 1 gram per liter (15 grains per quart) of hydroquinone.

 

From Ansco Formulas for Black and White Film by GAF, 1948 – Formulas are provided for historical reference. They may not work well with modern films and papers. Some of the chemicals can be dangerous. As with all photographic processes, be careful.

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FormulasThis formula is recommended because it is convenient in use and gives permanent results. The degree and character of intensification can be controlled to an extent by modification of the developing time used for the redeveloper.

 

Potassium Bichromate 9 g
Hydrochloric Acid 6 ml
Water to make 1 L

 

Immerse negatives in this solution until bleached, wash for 5 minutes in running water, and develop in bright but diffused light in a metol-hydroquinone developer such as Ansco 47. Negatives should then be given a 15-minute wash before drying. Intensification may be repeated for increased effect.

 

If any blue coloration of the film base is noticeable after intensification, it may be easily removed by washing the film for two or three seconds in water containing a few drops of ammonia, in a 5% solution of potassium metabisulfite, on in a 5% solution of sodium sulfite. This treatment should be followed by a through washing in water.

 

From Ansco Formulas for Black and White Film by GAF, 1948 – Formulas are provided for historical reference. They may not work well with modern films and papers. Some of the chemicals can be dangerous. As with all photographic processes, be careful.

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FormulasThis reducer is useful for lessening the density and contrast of heavy negatives.

 

Solution 1

Ferricyanide 35 g
Potassium Bromide 10 g
Water to make 1 L

 

Bleach in Solution 1 and after through washing, redevelop to desired density and contrast in Ansco 47 or other negative developer except fine-grain developers. Then fix and wash in usual manner. Conduct operation in subdued light.

 

From Ansco Formulas for Black and White Film by GAF, 1948 – Formulas are provided for historical reference. They may not work well with modern films and papers. Some of the chemicals can be dangerous. As with all photographic processes, be careful.

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TypewriterRichard Polt has collected a number of typewriter manuals from various sources, including this site.  After an email discussion we decided it would be a good thing to duplicate these manuals just in case something goes wrong online.

Here is the manual for the Brother Wizard typewriter.

brotherwizard

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FormulasThis is a cutting reducer for lessening the density of heavy negatives and at the same time increasing their contrast. It is especially valuable for reproduction films to clear the whites.

 

Solution 1

Sodium Thiosulfate 240 g
Water to make 1 L

 

Solution 2

Ferricyanide 19 g
Water to make 250 ml

 

For use, mix one part Solution 2 and fourparts Solution 1 in 32 parts water. Solutions 1 and 2 should be stored separately and mixed immediately before use.

 

From Ansco Formulas for Black and White Film by GAF, 1948 – Formulas are provided for historical reference. They may not work well with modern films and papers. Some of the chemicals can be dangerous. As with all photographic processes, be careful.

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TypewriterRichard Polt has collected a number of typewriter manuals from various sources, including this site.  After an email discussion we decided it would be a good thing to duplicate these manuals just in case something goes wrong online.

Here is the manual for the Brother Echelon 66 typewriter.

BrotherEchelon66

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FormulasThis formula produces rich green tones by combining the effects of iron blue toning and sulfide sepai toning. It must, however, be employed carefully and with particular attention both to the directions outlined below and to cleanliness in handling prints throughtout all steps of the process. The formula is not adaptable to all types of paper and surfaces and is suggested for use only with the following Ansco papers: Brovira, Velvet and Kashmir White; Cykora Kashmir White’ Cykon Kashmir White and Matte White’ and Projection Proof.

 

Solution 1

Ferricyanide 40 g
Water 1 L
Ammonia .91 S.G. (25% in weight) 15 ml

 

Solution 2

Ferric Ammonium Citrate 17 g
Water 1 L
Hydrochloric Acide Conc. 40 ml

 

Solution 3

Sodium Sulfide 2 g
Water 1 L
Hydrochloric Acid Conc.* 10 ml

 

*Do not add the Hydrochloric Acid to Solution 3 until immediately before use.

 

Black-and-white prints to be toned should be darker and softer than a normal print, using approximately 25% overexposure on the next softer grade of paper. Development of the print should be carried out in a suitable developer (A125 or A135) with particular attention given to avoid underdevelopment or forcing the print with overdevelopment. Prints should be fixed as usual, throughly washed and completely dried before toning.

 

Prints to be toned should be first soaked in cold water until limp and then placed in Solution 1 until bleached. This operation should be completed in 60 seconds or less, and the bleached prints immediately transferred to running water where thorough washing (at least 30 minutes) is effected.

 

Bleached prints are then placed in Solution 2 for 45 seconds to one minute, toning being permitted to continue until the deepest shadows are completely toned. Prints should then be washed briefly (4 to 6 minutes), excessive washing being undesirable in view of the solubility of the blue image. If wash water is slightly alkaline, it should be acidified somewhat with acetic acid to prevent degradtion of the blue tone during washing.

 

All solutions should be prepared within 24 hours before use. Great care should be taken to avoid contamination of Solutions 1 and 2. Even slight traces of Solution 1 carried over on hands or prints into Solution 2 can cause blue stains. Solution 3 should be used in a well-ventilated room, preferably near an open window or exhaust fand to lessen chance of inhaling hydrogen sulfide formed in the solution.

 

From Ansco Formulas for Black and White Film by GAF, 1948 – Formulas are provided for historical reference. They may not work well with modern films and papers. Some of the chemicals can be dangerous. As with all photographic processes, be careful.

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